PRESS STATEMENT: MACSA Formed to strengthen Human Rights in Malaysia

MALAYSIAN ALLIANCE OF CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANISATIONS IN THE UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW (UPR) PROCESS (MACSA) FORMED TO STRENGTHEN THE PROTECTION AND PROMOTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN MALAYSIA

16 NOVEMBER 2017

Between July and September 2017, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Malaysia (Wisma Putra) held consultations with several local civil society organisations (CSOs) primarily to explore a variety of human rights concerns in Malaysia. Human rights practices in the country had come under scrutiny following Malaysia’s participation in the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), a process for regularly evaluating the human rights practices of UN members initiated by the UN General Assembly in 2006.

Throughout the consultative sessions, the progress and implementation of human rights measures in Malaysia were discussed and the various CSOs in question were encouraged to be forthright about their concerns and to identify current and future challenges.

We laud and thank the Malaysian government for its openness and inclusivity in considering our views and concerns.

The scope of the consultative sessions were specifically based on the 2nd cycle of the UPR that took place four years ago, at the Human Rights Council (HRC) in Geneva. At that time, Malaysia received a total of 232 recommendations from 104 UN Member States (out of which, 150 recommendations were accepted by the Malaysian Government, and the remaining 82 recommendations dismissed). Malaysia is therefore expected to update the UN on the progress of the implementation of the agreed upon 150 recommendations, in the third cycle of the UPR, scheduled to be held next year, in the HRC, Geneva.

Based on this scope, the consultative sessions between Wisma Putra and the CSOs in Putrajaya, involved a number of broad topics, including:-

  1. Civil and Political Rights;
  2. Women, Children, Persons with Disabilities and Indigenous Peoples;
  3. Foreign Workers, Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Trafficked Persons;
  4. National Mechanisms on Human Rights; and
  5. General Recommendations, International Cooperation, Human Rights Education and Training, Enforcement Agencies, National Unity and National Cohesion.

Upon the conclusion of the aforesaid consultative sessions, various CSOs whose names are appended at the end of this statement, have decided that it is in our common interest to unite and form a coalition of CSOs with the specific aim of studying, as well as advocating, human rights issues in Malaysia for the UPR Process. It is thus with great pleasure that we announce the formation of the Malaysian Alliance of Civil Society Organisations in the UPR Process (MACSA).

It is MACSA’s stand that any recommendation accepted and implemented (or rejected and not implemented) by Malaysia, must, in addition to upholding international human rights instruments such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 (UDHR) ,the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam 1990 (CDHRI) and the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration 2012 (AHRD), also be in tandem with Malaysia’s own laws and customs, particularly with the Federal Constitution and the Constitutions and positions of the States existing within the Federation.

With such an aim and framework in mind, and with the generous support of the Wilayah Persekutuan Islamic Religious Council (MAIWP), MACSA will be sending a delegation of 16 human rights defenders consisting of academics, legal practitioners, a medical doctor as well as experts on various human rights subjects, to a training session on the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights / Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (ICCPR/CAT) and a Research Workshop on the UPR process at the Centre International de Conférences Genéve, Switzerland, from the 18th to 24th of November 2017. This is as part of our preparation for the third cycle of the UPR Process next year, especially for the Stakeholders’ Report on Human Rights in Malaysia that is to be submitted to the HRC.

From the outset, based on our involvement in the aforementioned consultative sessions, MACSA has several issues that are of particular concern, including, but not limited to, the following:-

1. National unity must be based on the Constitution – National unity is an important element to ensuring and safeguarding human rights in Malaysia. By fostering true and real unity among the Malaysian citizens, many of the human rights issues can be resolved, especially those involving inter-ethnic, inter-religious and/or inter-cultural skirmishes.

We note with concern that certain government departments, such as the Department of national Unity and Integration (JPNIN) and National Unity Consultative Council (NUCC) have been promoting national unity based on a fundamental conception; namely the notion that Malaysia is a secular country that makes no differentiation between people on the basis of religion and race, in a way that ignores our historical framework and flies in the face of clear and unequivocal provisions of the Federal Constitution. Our apex law designates Islam as the State religion (Article 3(1) of the Federal Constitution) and provides for the definition of Malays as its natives within Peninsula Malaysia and other groups (such as Kadazan, Iban, Melanau, etc) as its natives within Sabah and Sarawak. These classifications are important, especially in the advocacy of indigenous rights, as well as in the implementation of Article 152 of the Federal Constitution (pertaining to national language) and Article 153 of the Federal Constitution (pertaining to the position of the Malays and the legitimate interest of other communities).

2. Children – We note that the Child Act 2001 is supposed to be an implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) but the Act itself does not give the CRC legal force within Malaysia, nor make any breach of its provisions actionable in Malaysian courts. Instead, the Act purports to implement the CRC substantially, but there is a lack of comparison between the provisions of the CRC and Child Act 2001 in particular, and whether the two really align in substance. The Government is therefore urged to come up with a comprehensive study of the two, and make appropriate amendments to the Child Act 2001 as needed.

Further, while the introduction of the Sexual Offences Against Children Act 2017 is laudable, the presence of grammatical errors in the Act – with far reaching damaging effect – is highly regrettable. An example of such detrimental error would be Section 2(1) which provides that the Act “shall apply to a child who is under the age of eighteen years” thereby effectively leaving sexual offenders above the age of 18 years old as being precluded from the Act’s application. This clearly defeats the Act’s purpose to protect children from adult sexual offenders. Other examples abound in the Act.

3. Women – While the Government is doing much for women within the realm of policy, and is working to stem violence against women, we note that despite the ratification of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1995, the Government has yet to bring it into force within Malaysian law by enacting a comprehensive Gender Equality Act, although we note that the Government has made previous announcements on this. While we find the proposal acceptable in principle, it needs to be scrutinised to ensure that it does not come into conflict with the Shariah, and does not transgress upon the jurisdictions of the States. Malaysia has made a number of reservations to CEDAW for precisely this reason.

The plight of Muslim women who continue to be denied the freedom to wear the headscarf when being employed in particular needs to be addressed. Various businesses in Malaysia have made it common practice to prohibit their women employees from donning the headscarf at their workplace, despite this being contrary to freedom of religion, equality before the law and freedom of expression.

The decision of the Court of Appeal in Air Asia Berhad v Rafizah Shima which held that basic rights that are safeguarded in the Federal Constitution are only enforceable against a public entity, and not against a private corporation, must be addressed by way of enacting the appropriate legislations. Private corporations must be expected to uphold the basic rights of their employees, including that of freedom of religion as well as protection against discrimination on the basis of gender.

Malaysia does not have Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) to protect women’s rights in the workplace. Both the existing Employment Act 1955 and the Industrial Relations Act 1967 provide very minimal relief. Sadly, pregnant woman still has poor avenues to make their complaints heard. These complaints range from being forced to work at a site considered dangerous for pregnancies to denying them promotions, placing them on prolonged probation, demoting them and terminating their services.

4. Indigenous peoples – The progress and advancement of Malays must be included within the scope of indigenous peoples, as Malays are defined as the indigenous peoples of Malaya by the Malaysian Constitution. It would be disingenuous of the Government to provide for the progression of native Sabahans and Sarawakians, while ignoring the needs of native Malayans in Peninsula Malaysia. In this regard, the Government must do more to reclaim Malay reserve land that has been lost contrary to existing Malay Reserve Enactments and Article 89 of the Constitution. The Government must reform and update the law and policy on Malay reserve land.

With regard to non-Malay natives, of concern is the need to revive the dormant National Task Force on Aboriginals announced in 2013, which must also be urged to move ahead with substantive law reforms and on-the-ground practice changes in order to assist the aboriginals and guarantee their livelihood and live them out of poverty and isolation.

In the case of Peninsula Malaysia, perhaps a comprehensive programme or action plan on integrating the aboriginals with the mainstream Malay community, such as educational and Islamic outreach to deepen their understanding of Malay society, encouraging them to adopt Malay language, and to assimilate to Malay culture and customs – without compromising their own native culture – could be considered as a way to facilitate their integration into the modern Malay community.

5. Stateless Persons – The problem with stateless persons continues to be a serious threat to nation building that must be tackled and handled with serious care and political will, especially in the States of Sabah and Sarawak. There are reported cases of children who were born in the States of Sabah and Sarawak, but are not properly documented. These occur especially when children are born to parents who did not register their marriage, since one or both of them are of foreign citizenship. This leaves the children marginalized from the community and society. Without proper documentation, they cannot attend schools and receive proper education, and as time passes, the children grow up as vulnerable individuals. With the increased number of undocumented persons, the problem would only be compounded with a section of the community being totally cut off, with no access to the nation’s progress and development.

MACSA would like to stress that save for a few concerns that we have highlighted to the Government via our participation in the consultation sessions stated above, we are happy that the Government has drawn up comprehensive action plans to address needs associated with targeted groups on various human rights issues. MACSA is willing to offer our assistance as and when necessary to the Malaysian Government and work hand in hand in addressing and improving human rights conditions in Malaysia for the benefit of all its citizens. We hope that the participation of our delegates at the training session and Research Workshop at the Centre International de Conférences Genéve, Switzerland, would be useful in this regard.

We would also like to extend our invitation to civil society organisations across the nation to join our newly formed coalition, and let us all work together to raise the human rights practices in our country.

Azril Mohd Amin

Chairman,

Malaysian Alliance of Civil Society Organisations

in the UPR Process (MACSA)

Associate Professor Dr. Rafidah Hanim Mokhtar

Co-Chairperson,

MACSA

Endorsed by:

Centre for Human Rights Research and Advocacy (CENTHRA)│Allied Coordinating Committee of Islamic NGOs (ACCIN)│Persatuan Peguam-Peguam Muslim Malaysia (PPMM) | Islamic and Strategic Studies Institute Berhad (ISSI)│Ikatan Pengamal Perubatan dan Kesihatan Muslim Malaysia (I-MEDIK)│Darul Insyirah│Pertubuhan Muafakat Sejahtera Masyarakat Malaysia (MUAFAKAT)│Persatuan Orang Cacat Penglihatan Islam Malaysia (PERTIS)│Persatuan Belia Islam Nasional (PEMBINA)│Concerned Lawyers for Justice (CLJ)│Pertubuhan Ikatan Kekeluargaan Rumpun Nusantara (HARUM)│Gabungan Peguam Muslim Malaysia (i-PEGUAM)│Ikatan Muslimin Malaysia (ISMA)│Majlis Ittihad Ummah│Pusat Kecemerlangan Pendidikan Ummah (PACU)│Persatuan Peguam Syarie Malaysia (PGSM)│CONCERN (Coalition of Sabah Islamic NGOs) | Harakah Islamiah (HIKMAH) | Lembaga Al-Hidayah | Malaysian Chinese Muslim Association (MACMA) Sarawak | Halaqah Kemajuan Muslim Sarawak (HIKAM) | Pertubuhan IKRAM Negeri Sarawak | Pertubuhan Kebajikan Islam Malaysia (PERKIM) Cawangan Sarawak | Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) Negeri Sarawak | Yayasan Ikhlas Sarawak | Persatuan Ranuhabban Akhi Ukhti (PRAU) | Ikatan Graduan Melayu Sarawak (IGMS) | Persatuan Kebangsaan Melayu Sarawak (PKMS) | Sukarelawan Al-Falah YADIM Sarawak │ Persatuan Kebajikan Masyarakat Islam Subang Jaya (PERKEMAS) │ Young Professionals │Pertubuhan Damai & Cinta Insani │ Yayasan Ihtimam Malaysia │ Persatuan Amal Firdausi (PAFI) │ Persatuan Jihad Ekonomi Muslim Bersatu Malaysia | Yayasan Himmah Malaysia (HIMMAH) | Persatuan Syafaqah Ummah (SYAFAQAH) | Gabungan Persatuan Institusi Tahfiz Al-Quran Kebangsaan (PINTA)

KENYATAAN MEDIA:

MALAYSIAN ALLIANCE OF CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANISATIONS IN THE UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW (UPR) PROCESS (MACSA) DIBENTUK BAGI MEMPERKUKUH DAN MEMPROMOSIKAN HAK ASASI MANUSIA DI MALAYSIA

16 November 2017

Di antara bulan Julai hingga September 2017, Kementerian Luar Negeri, Malaysia (Wisma Putra) telah mengadakan sesi rundingan bersama badan-badan bukan kerajaan (NGO) bagi menerokai isu-isu hak asasi manusia di Malaysia. Praktis dan amalan hak asasi manusia di Malaysia mendapat sorotan berikutan keterlibatan Malaysia dalam Semakan Berkala Sejagat (Universal Periodic Review atau ringkasnya UPR), iaitu sebuah proses semakan yang dibuat secara berkala, bagi menilai tahap pengamalan hak asasi di negara-negara PBB, selaras dengan keputusan dalam Perhimpunan Agung PBB pada tahun 2006.

Sepanjang sesi rundingan tersebut, perkembangan dan pelaksanaan hak asasi manusia di Malaysia telah dibincangkan dengan terperinci, dan NGO-NGO yang hadir diberi ruang untuk menyuarakan aspirasi serta sebarang kebimbangan berkenaan pengamalan hak asasi manusia bagi mengenal pasti cabaran-cabaran semasa dan akan datang.

Berikutan itu, kami ingin merakamkan penghargaan dan ucapan terima kasih atas sikap keterbukaan dan inklusiviti kerajaan Malaysia dalam meraikan pandangan dan kebimbangan kami.

Skop sesi perundingan ini secara khususnya adalah berdasarkan kepada kitaran kedua UPR yang telah berlangsung empat tahun lalu, di Majlis Hak Asasi Manusia (Human Rights Council atau ringkasnya HRC) di Geneva. Malaysia selaku salah sebuah negara anggota dalam PBB telah menerima 232 syor yang dibuat oleh 104 negara-negara anggota yang lain (yang mana 150 syor telah diterima oleh Kerajaan Malaysia dan baki 82 syor telah ditolak). Oleh yang demikian, Malaysia dikehendaki mengemaskini perkembangan dan pelaksanaan 150 syor tersebut pada Kitaran Ketiga UPR, yang dijadualkan akan berlangsung pada tahun hadapan di HRC, Geneva.

Berdasarkan cakupan tersebut, sesi perundingan yang berlangsung baru-baru ini di antara Wisma Putra dan NGO-NGO di Purajaya adalah meliputi topik-topik yang berikut:-

(i) Hak Sivil dan Politik;

(ii) Wanita, Kanak-kanak, Orang Kelainan Upaya dan Orang Asli;

(iii) Pekerja Warga Asing, Pelarian, Pencari Suaka dan Pemerdagangan Manusia;

(iv) Indikator Nasional Hak Asasi Manusia

(v) Cadangan-cadangan Umum, Kerjasama Antarabangsa, Pendidikan dan Latihan Hak Asasi Manusia, Pemerkasaan Agensi, Kesatuan dan Perpaduan Nasional.

Setelah selesai sesi perundingan tersebut, sebilangan NGO yang nama-namanya dilampirkan di akhir kenyataan ini, telah memutuskan untuk membentuk satu pakatan dengan maksud bagi memberi tumpuan khusus terhadap pembelaan dan penelitian seputar isu-isu hak asasi manusia di Malaysia untuk dibawa dalam Proses UPR. Lantaran itu, kami dengan sukacitanya mengumumkan penubuhan Malaysian Alliance Of Civil Society Organisations in the UPR Process (MACSA).

MACSA berpendirian bahawa sebarang bentuk syor hak asasi yang hendak diterima pakai untuk dilaksanakan di Malaysia (atau yang ditolak untuk tidak dilaksanakan), mestilah, selain mengambil kira instrumen hak asasi manusia di peringkat antarabangsa — seperti Deklarasi Sejagat Hak Asasi Manusia 1948 (Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 atau ringkasnya UDHR), Deklarasi Kaherah tentang Hak Asasi Manusia dalam Islam 1990 (Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam 1990 atau ringkasnya CDHRI) dan Deklarasi Hak Asasi Manusia ASEAN 2012 (ASEAN Human Rights Declaration 2012 atau ringkasnya AHRD) — juga perlu dipastikan selaras dan mematuhi undang-undang serta adat dan tradisi di Malaysia, terutamanya Perlembagaan Pesekutuan, Undang-undang Tubuh Negeri-Negeri, serta kedudukan dan kedaulatan negeri-negeri yang sedia termaktub dalam Perlembagaan.

Justeru, dengan hasrat dan objektif yang sedemikian itu, serta dengan sokongan daripada Majlis Agama Islam Wilayah Persekutuan (MAIWP), MACSA akan menghantar satu delegasi yang terdiri daripada 16 orang aktivis hak asasi manusa, yang termasuk di antaranya ahli akademik, pengamal undang-undang, doktor perubatan serta pakar-pakar skop bidang tertentu hak asasi manusia, ke sesi latihan mengenai Perjanjian Antarabangsa Mengenai Hak-Hak Sivil Dan Politik / Konvensyen Terhadap Larangan Penyeksaan dan Kekejaman, Ketidak Peri Kemanusiaan, atau Penghinaan Yang Lain (Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment atau ringkasnya ICCPR/CAT) dan Bengkel Penyelidikan Proses UPR di Centre International de Conférences Genève, Switzerland pada 18 hingga 24 November 2017. Ini adalah sebagai rangka persediaan kami untuk Kitaran Ketiga Proses UPR yang dijadualkan pada tahun hadapan, terutamanya sebagai persiapan menyediakan Laporan Pihak Berkepentingan mengenai Hak Asasi Manusia di Malaysia yang akan dihantar kepada HRC.

Secara rumusannya, berdasarkan penglibatan kami dalam sesi perundingan yang dikelolai Wisma Putra, MACSA melihat beberapa isu yang pada hemat kami perlu diberikan perhatian khusus, termasuklah antaranya:-

1. Perpaduan nasional mestilah berdasarkan kepada Perlembagaan – Perpaduan nasional adalah elemen yang penting bagi memelihara hak asasi manusia di Malaysia. Pemeliharaan nilai perpaduan yang baik dalam kalangan rakyat Malaysia akan mampu menyelesaikan banyak isu hak asasi manusia, terutamanya isu-isu yang melibatkan pertikaian antara etnik, antara agama serta isu-isu pertembungan antara budaya.

Dalam hal ini, kebimbangan MACSA ialah apabila ada sebilangan jabatan kerajaan, seperti Jabatan Perpaduan Negara dan Integrasi Nasional (JPNIN) dan Majlis Perundingan Perpaduan Negara (NUCC), yang cuba membentuk perpaduan nasional, tetapi tidak berasaskan kepada falsafah dan kerangka yang diperuntukkan dalam Perlembagaan Persekutuan. Ini dapat dilihat apabila perpaduan nasional cuba dibentuk berasaskan kepada suatu fahaman dan konsep yang asing, berteraskan andaian bahawa Malaysia kononnya mempunyai kerangka yang sekular, serta cubaan untuk menghapuskan sebarang perbezaan di antara bangsa dan agama dalam rakyat berbilang kaum di negara ini — sekaligus membelakangkan kerangka sejarah negarabangsa yang panjang, dan beranggahan dengan peruntukan-peruntukan khusus dalam Perlembagaan Persekutuan. Perlembagaan selaku undang-undang tertinggi telah mengistiharkan Islam sebagai agama negara, seperti yang teramaktub dalam Perkara 3(1) Perlembagaan Persekutuan dan memberikan takrifan orang Melayu sebagai penduduk pribumi di Persekutuan Tanah Melayu, manakala kumpulan etnik lain (seperti Kadazan, Iban, Melanau, dll) adalah penduduk pribumi di Sabah dan Sarawak. Pengkelasan ini adalah penting terutamanya dalam pembelaan hak-hak pribumi dan orang-orang asal, sepertimana yang termaktub dalam Perkara 153 Perlembagaan Persekutuan (mengenai kedudukan orang Melayu dan kepentingan-kepentingan yang sah komuniti lain).

2. Kanak-kanak – MACASA mengambil maklum bahawa Akta Kanak-kanak 2001 adalah dimaktubkan sebagai langkah pelaksanaan terhadap Konvensyen mengenai Hak Kanak-kanak (Convention on the Rights of the Child). Namun malangnya Akta ini tidak menjadikan CRC sebagai suatu dokumen perundangan yang mengikat di Malaysia, lantas sebarang pelanggaran terhadap peruntukan CRC tidak dapat dikuatkuasakan di Mahkamah dalam negara. Sungguhpun Akta tersebut bertujuan untuk melaksanakan CRC, namun belum ada sebarang perbandingan yang komprehensif dibuat, khususnya di antara antara Akta tersebut dengan peruntukan-peruntukan dalam CRC bagi melihat sama ada keduanya adalah selari ataupun tidak. Oleh yang demikian, Kerajaan digesa untuk menyelidik secara lebih teliti dan rapi terhadap Akta Kanak-Kanak 2001 dan CRC, serta membuat pindaan yang sewajarnya ke atas peruntukan-peruntukan yang berkaitan dalam Akta Kanak-Kanak 2001.

Selanjutnya, langkah kerjaan bagi meluluskan Akta Kesalahan-Kesalahan Jenayah Seksual Kanak-Kanak adalah sesuatu yang patut dipuji, tetapi kesalahan dan keralatan struktur ayat dalam Akta tersebut ternyata dapat menyebabkan niat baik pihak kerajaan tersebut tergendala. Kesilapan ini dapat dilihat misalnya dalam Seksyen 2(1) yang memperuntukkan bahawa Akta tersebut hanya berkuatkuasa terhadap kanak-anak yang berumur di bawah 18 tahun, sekaligus menyebabkan para pesalah seks dewasa yang berumur 18 tahun dan ke atas tidak dapat disabitkan di bawah Akta ini. Ini tentunya bercanggah dengan tujuan asal ia digubal, yakni melindungi kanak-kanak daripada pesalah seks dewasa. Keralatan dan kesalahan lain dalam Akta tersebut perlu diteliti oleh pihak kerajaan supaya tidak berlaku masalah di peringkat penguatkuasaan nanti.

3. Wanita – Dalam pada kerajaan telah melaksanakan banyak langkah-langkah yang positif di peringkat polisi bagi mengekang keganasan terhadap wanita, MACSA walaubagaimanapun mengambil maklum bahawa kerajaan masih belum lagi menggubal undang-undang bagi menguatkuasakan Konvensyen Mengenai Penghapusan Segala Bentuk Diskriminasi terhadap Wanita (Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women atau ringkasnya CEDAW), yang telah sebelum ini diratifikasi oleh Malaysia pada tahun 1995. Akta Kesaksamaan Jantina, misalnya, masih belum digubal. Dalam pada MACSA bersetuju secara prinsipnya dengan semangat yang terkandung dalam CEDAW, MACSA berpendirian bahawa ia hendaklah diteliti bagi memastikan tidak timbul sebarang konflik dengan perundangan Syariah di negara ini, serta tidak melanggar sebarang bidang kuasa dan kedaulatan di peringkat Negeri-Negeri.

Hak-hak wanita Muslimah yang secara berterusan dinafikan kebebasan untuk menutup aurat semasa berkerja di beberapa sektor, perlulah diambil perhatian segera. Pelbagai premis perniagaan di Malaysia menjadikan larangan bertudung kepada pekerja wanita di tempat kerja sebagai suatu pengamalan yang biasa, walhal pengamalan ini adalah sebenarnya bertentangan dengan kebebasan beragama, nilai persamaan dalam undang-undang serta kebebasan bersuara.

Keputusan Mahkamah Rayuan dalam kes Air Aisa Berhad v Rafizah Shima yang memutuskan bahawa hak asasi yang dilindungi Perlembagaan Persekutuan hanyalah berkuatkuasa terhadap badan-badan kerajaan, dan tidak boleh dikuatkuasakan ke atas entiti swasta, perlu diatasi melalui penambahbaikan dengan menggubal undang-undang yang berkaitan. Syarikat swasta tidak seharusnya dibenarkan untuk menafikan hak-hak asasi para pekerja mereka, termasuklah hak kebebasan beragama serta kawalan terhadap diskriminasi atas alasan jantina.

Malaysia juga masih belum menggubal Akta Diskriminasi Kehamilan bagi melindungi hak wanita hamil di tempat kerja. Sungguhpun kita sudah ada Akta Kerja 1955 dan Akta Perhubungan Perusahaan 1967, tetapi kedua-dua Akta tersebut hanya memperuntukkan relif yang sangat minimal ke atas wanita hamil yang didiskriminasi. Masih terdapat banyak aduan berkenaan wanita hamil yang terpaksa meneruskan kerja-kerja di persekitaran yang berbahaya, atau dinafikan kenaikan pangkat dan gaji atas sebab kehamilannya, ditempatkan dalam tempoh percubaan yang lama, selain diberhentikan kerja atas sebab kehamilan.

4. Orang-orang asal / Penduduk Pribumi – Kerajaan perlu memasukkan kemajuan orang-orang Melayu sebagai agenda bagi memajukan orang-orang asal / penduduk pribumi, kerana Melayu sememangnya penduduk asal Tanah Melayu, berasaskan kepada semangat Perlembagaan Persekutuan. Usaha ini harus seiring dengan usaha meningkatkan kemajuan orang-orang asal di Sabah dan Sarawak. Oleh yang demikian, kerajaan haruslah lebih berusaha untuk mengembalikan tanah rizab Melayu yang telah sebahagiannya hilang, bertentangan dengan Enakmen Tanah Rizab Melayu dan Perkara 89 Perlembagaan. Selain itu, Kerajaan juga mestilah memperbaharui dan mengemaskini undang-undang dan dasar Tanah Rizab Melayu.

Berhubung dengan orang-orang asal bukan Melayu, MACSA berpendapat terdapat keperluan untuk menghidupkan kembali Pasukan Petugas Kebangsaan untuk Orang Asli yang diumumkan pada tahu 2013; selain keperluan untuk menggubal penambah-baikan terhadap undang-undang yang sedia ada, serta tatacara amalan ke atas tanah-tanah adat bagi menjamin kelangsungan kehidupan dan masyarakat orang-orang asal ini terhindar daripada kemiskinan mahupun keterasingan.

Bagi orang-orang asal di Semenanjung Malaysia, program atau pelan tindakan komprehensif bagi mengintegrasikan orang-orang asli dengan komuniti persekitaran Melayu boleh dipertimbangkan. Hal ini boleh dilaksanakan melalui usaha pendidikan dan dakwah, serta mempertingkat penghayatan dan pemahaman terhadap peradaban Melayu, galakan pengunaan Bahasa Melayu, serta mengasimilasikan budaya dan adat-adat Melayu tanpa mengesampingkan budaya asal Orang-Orang Asli.

5. Warga Tanpa Negara – Masalah dengan warga tanpa negara, atau stateless persons, adalah satu ancaman yang serius kepada pembinaan negarabangsa. Justeru perkara ini mestilah diatasi dan diberikan perhatian yang serius terutama sekali di kedua-dua negeri Sabah dan Sarawak. Terdapat kes yang dilaporkan mengenai bayi yang dilahirkan di Sabah dan Sarawak tetapi tidak mempunyai dokumentasi yang sah. Perkara ini berlaku apabila bayi dilahirkan daripada pasangan yang tidak mendaftarkan perkahwinan mereka, sama ada disebabkan kedua-duanya adalah warga asing, atau salah seorang daripada ibu atau bapa adalah merupakan warga asing. Ia menyebabkan kesan buruk, apabila kanak-kanak tersebut dipinggirkan daripada komuniti dan masyarakat. Tanpa dokumentasi yang sah, kanak-kanak ini tidak dapat bersekolah untuk menerima pendidikan, lantas menyebabkan mereka membesar sebagai golongan rentan. Seiring dengan waktu, jumlah golongan rentan ini akan hanya bertambah, sekaligus menyebabkan masalah yang lebih teruk apabila wujudnya suatu kumpulan manusia yang terputus dan terasing daripada akses kepada kemajuan dan pembangunan negara.

Selain daripada beberapa isu dan perkara yang telah dibangkitkan dalam sesi rundingan yang dinyatakan di atas, MACSA ingin merakamkan penghargaan kepada Kerajaan Malaysia atas langkah-langkah yang telah diambil dan pelan tindakan yang komprehensif untuk menangani keperluan-keperluan yang berkaitan dengan kumpulan sasaran mengenai isu hak asasi manusia. MACSA bersedia untuk bekerja sama dengan Kerajaan Malaysia, dan dengan mana-mana entiti lain, dalam rangka untuk mengatasi dan memperbaiki keadaan hak asasi manusia di Malaysia, demi kepentingan semua. Kami berharap penglibatan delegasi MACSA ke sesi latihan dan Bengkel Penyelidikan di Centre International de Conférences Genève, Switzerland akan dapat menyumbang ke arah penambah-baikan taraf hak asasi manusia di Malaysia.

MACSA juga ingin memanjangkan jemputan kepada mana-mana NGO atau badan-badan yang berkaitan untuk sama-sama menyertai gabungan MACSA, untuk sama-sama kita bekerja ke arah memperteguh amalan hak asasi manusia di Malaysia.

Azril Mohd Amin

Pengerusi

Malaysian Alliance of Civil Society Soiety Organisations

in the UPR Process (MACSA)

Prof. Madya Dr. Rafidah Hanim Mokhtar

Pengerusi Bersama

MACSA

Disokong oleh :

Centre For Human Rights Research and Advocacy (CENTHRA)│Allied Coordinating Committee of Islamic NGOs (ACCIN) │Persatuan Peguam-Peguam Muslim Malaysia (PPMM) | Islamic & Strategic Studies Institute (ISSI) | Ikatan Pengamal Perubatan dan Kesihatan Muslim Malaysia (I-Medik)│Darul Insyirah│Pertubuhan Muafakat Sejahtera Masyarakat Malaysia (MUAFAKAT)│Persatuan Orang Cacat Penglihatan Islam Malaysia (PERTIS)│Persatuan Belia Islam Nasional (PEMBINA)│Concerned Lawyers for Justice (CLJ)│Pertubuhan Ikatan Kekeluargaan Rumpun Nusantara (HARUM)│Gabungan Peguam Muslim Malaysia (I-Peguam)│Ikatan Muslimin Malaysia (ISMA)│Majlis Ittihad Ummah│Pusat Kecemerlangan Pendidikan Ummah (PACU)│Persatuan Peguam Syarie Malaysia (PGSM)│CONCERN (Coalition of Sabah Islamic NGOs) | Harakah Islamiah (HIKMAH) | Lembaga Al-Hidayah | Malaysian Chinese Muslim Association (MACMA) Sarawak | Halaqah Kemajuan Muslim Sarawak (HIKAM) | Pertubuhan IKRAM Negeri Sarawak | Pertubuhan Kebajikan Islam Malaysia (PERKIM) Cawangan Sarawak | Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) Negeri Sarawak | Yayasan Ikhlas Sarawak | Persatuan Ranuhabban Akhi Ukhti (PRAU) | Ikatan Graduan Melayu Sarawak (IGMS) | Persatuan Kebangsaan Melayu Sarawak (PKMS) | Sukarelawan Al-Falah YADIM Sarawak │ Persatuan Kebajikan Masyarakat Islam Subang Jaya (PERKEMAS) │ Young Professionals │Pertubuhan Damai & Cinta Insani │ Yayasan Ihtimam Malaysia │ Persatuan Amal Firdausi (PAFI) │ Persatuan Jihad Ekonomi Muslim Bersatu Malaysia | Yayasan Himmah Malaysia (HIMMAH) | Persatuan Syafaqah Ummah (SYAFAQAH) | Gabungan Persatuan Institusi Tahfiz Al-Quran Kebangsaan (PINTA)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s